The Best Way to Learn Kanji (2024)

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Kanji: the nemesis of Japanese language learners!

The fear of memorising kanji is enough to put some people off Japanese altogether. When people start researching how to learn Japanese, the kanji question comes up a lot.

We’ve even heard people ask if it’s possible to learn Japanese without learning kanji.

Seriously, guys?! Let’s sort this out!

In this article we’ll look at what kanji are, why you need to know them, and the best way to learn kanji.

You’ll be writing in kanji before you know it!

Contents

  • 1 About the Japanese scripts
  • 2 How am I supposed to learn kanji?
  • 3 The repetition method
    • 3.1 Pros
    • 3.2 Cons
  • 4 Learn with Japanese children’s books
    • 4.1 Pros
    • 4.2 Cons
  • 5 The Heisig method
    • 5.1 Pros
    • 5.2 Cons
  • 6 Learn kanji by radicals
    • 6.1 Pros
    • 6.2 Cons
  • 7 Flashcards
    • 7.1 Pros
    • 7.2 Cons
  • 8 Bonus video

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (1)

About the Japanese scripts

Japanese kanji originally came from Chinese. They’re what we call ‘logographic characters’, which means that each character represents a meaning (not a sound, like in our alphabet).

Alongside hiragana and katakana, they are one of Japan’s three main official scripts, and an essential building block of the written language.

There are tens of thousands of kanji out there, but ‘only’ around 2,000 kanji are essential for basic literacy. These essential kanji are called the jouyou kanji. They are set by the government, and all Japanese students are expected to know them by the time they graduate high school.

In short, no, you can’t avoid kanji all together if you want to learn Japanese.

You simply have to make them a part of your study routine.

Avoiding kanji all together would be like only learning half of the English alphabet. You’d only be semi-literate.

But the good news is, it’s easier to learn kanji than you might expect!

How am I supposed to learn kanji?

The trick is finding a learning style that works for you.

There are several different methods and tactics for learning Japanese kanji. Some people swear by certain methods, which might have no effect for others.

In this article I’ll share some of the most popular methods for learning kanji. Have a think about which ones appeal to you, test them out, and then stick with your favourite.

Anyone can learn kanji – trust me!

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (2)

The repetition method

This seems to be the most common way of studying kanji. This involves writing out each kanji over and over… and over… and over.

The repetition will help each kanji stick in your head, and over time, you will also start to learn each kanji by muscle memory.

Most people apply the repetition method to memorise the kanji from a textbook or course.

These courses will usually present you with the most ‘useful’, everyday kanji first. Well, this kind of makes sense because after all, you want to get reading and writing as soon as possible, right?

However, unfortunately some of the most useful kanji are the most difficult to write! Take 読 (read) or 飲(drink). They probably look pretty complicated if you’re new to Japanese, right? These are usually some of the first kanji taught in textbooks. And they are definitely good to know if you’re planning a trip to Japan.

But, if you’ve never studied Japanese before, they can look discouragingly difficult.

Also, learning kanji in order of use like this means it can be difficult to see similarities and patterns between the kanji.

If you do want to try the repetition method, some special Japanese graph paper will come in handy, as it will show you how to keep your characters well proportioned and balanced on the page.

Pros

  • You will learn the most useful kanji first – good for motivation!
  • You’ll develop nice handwriting
  • You’ll start to remember kanji through muscle memory

Cons

  • Takes a long time
  • Not the most effective for long term memory
  • Kanji not always learned in a logical order

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (3)

Learn with Japanese children’s books

Japanese children learn kanji each school grade in an order prescribed by the Ministry of Education. You can see a list of kanji by grade here. Most dictionaries will have a list, too.

Japanese children’s books are a fun and cute way to learn kanji! As with textbooks for foreigners, kanji books for children are mostly structured in a way that present the most useful, everyday kanji first.

This is great if you want to start reading and understanding Japanese as soon as possible. However, unfortunately the most useful kanji are not always the easiest to learn!

You should alsoremember that Japanese children already speak Japanese, even if they can’t read or write all the kanji. Therefore, this system won’t be so effective for teaching you the nuances of language that foreigners need to know.

There are hundreds of different books available to teach kanji to kids. Most of these have the advantage of teaching the stroke order (exactly how each kanji should be written), and have lots of pre-printed characters for you to trace while you get used to the way to write each kanji.

If you live in Japan, you’ll be able to find a selection of these books at any bookstore or even the 100 yen store! If you live elsewhere, it might be harder to find these books, but there are still lots of good resources available online.

Pros

  • Children’s books are fun and cute
  • You’ll learn the most useful kanji first
  • It’s motivational to measure your level against the Japanese school system

Cons

  • Requires time and repetition
  • Difficult to find resources outside of Japan
  • You might not be able to read the Japanese instructions in the book at first!

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (4)

The Heisig method

The Heisig method for studying kanji is somewhat divisive in the Japanese leaning community. Some people love it, some people hate it!

James Heisig is a scholar who devised a unique method for learning the 2000-odd most useful kanji quickly and effectively. His method is published in the books Remembering the Kanji. So there are actually three separate volumes, but the first is more than enough for most people’s needs.

The Heisig method focuses on teaching you kanji in a way that make them easy to remember.

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (5)

Heisig’s trick is that he groups kanji together based on radical. Radicals are the essential smaller elements that kanji are made up of.

When you’re new to Japanese, a character like 願 (used in お願いします, ‘please’) looks like a completely random mess of lines, right?

But nothing is random about kanji. 願 is actually made up of many smaller parts, such as 厂 (the ‘cliff’ radical), 白 (white), and so on.

The Heisig method teaches you kanji in batches based on these radicals (basic elements). Each new kanji is based on kanji you already know. Over time, you become familiar with more and more elements. Then, you’ll find yourself able to remember more and more complicated kanji effortlessly.

He also advocates coming up with an effective story or mnemonic to remember which elements make up each kanji character. Heisig claims that if you can create an effective kanji story once, it will stick in your brain forever – with no need to write the kanji out over and over.

The book is designed for serious students, who have the ultimate goal of becoming fluent in Japanese and knowing all the jouyou kanji:

Because of the way the book is structured in batches based around radicals, there are some rarer kanji which appear right at the beginning of the book, and some ‘basic’ kanji which don’t appear until right at the end. For example, 人 (person) is kanji 951 in the book!

You have to really commit to Heisig and finish the entire course. If you give up half way through, you won’t have covered some of the most useful kanji.

Pros

  • A huge number of Japanese learners call this the fastest and most effective way to learn all 2000-odd jouyou kanji. If you’re serious about becoming fluent in Japanese, this might be the best method for you.
  • The kanji are presented in a logical order, and should stick in your head for longer
  • You will learn how kanji are built up from smaller parts, making it easier to read and learn new kanji in future

Cons

  • You won’t necessarily learn the most useful kanji first
  • Best suited for serious learners aiming for fluency

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (6)

Learn kanji by radicals

As we said above,radicals are the essential smaller elements that kanji are made up of. For example, the kanji for ‘wood’ (林) is made from two ‘tree’ radicals (木) (unfortunately, they’re not all that easy!)

Learning kanji by learning the radicals first is a common method that makes a lot of sense in my opinion! Heisig’s book is the most famous and thorough, example of that but there are many others.

You can actually download a free kanji ebook called A Radical Approach to Mastering Kanji from JapanesePod101 (you don’t have to be a paid member to access it, but you do need to make a free account – all you need is an email address.)

This book introduces the top 50 radicals, which together appear in over 75% of the jouyou kanji! So by learning these 50 radicals, you have a massive head start in learning to read the most essential characters.

Pros

  • Logical
  • Easier to learn new kanji, once you’re familiar with the basic parts
  • Free book!

Cons

  • Have to study in a particular order – may miss more useful kanji
  • Still requires some degree of repetition to make them stick

Flashcards

Flashcards have always been a well-loved resource for language learners. These days, purpose made computers and smartphone apps make it easier than ever to store and carry your cards.

Flashcards can be a great way to learn new vocab and revise the words you learned previously. There are several options for using flashcards. If you prefer the old-school paper version, there are several sets for sale. This set from White Rabbit Press is a popular choice for beginners, which covers the first 300 kanji you need to know. Or, you can always make your own on plain paper or pre-cut index cards.

There are also several flashcard apps and software programs available. The best useSRS (spaced repetition software). Rather than cycling through all of your cards on a loop, an SRS will calculate when to show you a card again based on how easy it was for you to remember it.

A difficult card might come up again five minutes later, but an easy card might come up next week, or even next month or next year after you’ve been studying for a while. This is based on research that shows that the memorisation is most effective when you try to recall something just as you’re on the point of forgetting it. Also, you won’t get sobored seeing the same easy cards all the time.

One of the top rated flashcard apps out there is Anki. You can either download pre-written decks of cards, or write your own. You can find pre-written decks to go with most popular textbooks (such as Genki or Remembering the Kanji), which will save you a lot of time!

My recommended e-learning course, JapanesePod101, also has a flashcard module to help you review the new words and kanji from each lesson.

Some people learn kanji through exposure to flashcards alone. However, other people may find that flashcards work bestin conjunction with one of the other methods listed above. You can use flashcards to consolidate and review your learning.

Pros

  • Flashcards are portable, and great for filling in spare moments commuting or waiting in line
  • Flashcards help to consolidate new words into long term memory

Cons

  • Flashcards can teach you individual words, but not the whole language
  • Best combined with another language learning method

Bonus video

And hey, if you’re really struggling with learning kanji, don’t feel too bad… you’re not alone 😉

How do you learn kanji? Any tips? Share them with us in the comments!

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (8)

The Best Way to Learn Kanji (2024)

FAQs

What is the most efficient way to learn kanji? ›

Best Japanese Kanji Learning Method
  1. Rote Memorization. The best way to learn any language is through repetition. ...
  2. Mnemonics. ...
  3. Learn 常用漢字 (Jouyou Kanji) ...
  4. Study the Kanji of Words that You Most Commonly Use. ...
  5. Learn Radicals. ...
  6. Learn the Kanji of Words on Your Vocabulary List. ...
  7. Read Japanese Reading Material. ...
  8. Use a Dictionary.

Is there a trick to learning kanji? ›

Try making kanji flashcards for any kanji you have a hard time remembering. I do it a few different ways: Make cards with kanji on the front to practise either for their meaning or pronunciation. Create cards with whole sentences on them and practice reading them, kanji and all.

Can I learn 10 kanji a day? ›

If you learn 10 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 200 days (just under 7 months) If you learn 5 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 400 days (just over 13 months) If you learn just 2 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 1000 days (less than 3 years)

How many kanji do you need to know to be literate? ›

There are about 2,000 kanji characters in common use and once you get them down, you're officially literate. You can then read newspapers and most books. There are thousands more and even Japanese folks don't know them all, but knowing 2,000 characters more or less gets the job done.

Do Japanese forget kanji? ›

Yes and no. In terms of writing ability, you could argue that Japanese people have somewhat forgotten kanji. As most people don't write things by hand anymore it has gotten easier to forget. It's the same as how English speakers say they've forgotten how to spell sometimes.

How many kanji does a Japanese person know? ›

Virtually every adult in Japan can recognize over 2,000 kanji. A university educated person will recognize around 3,000, and an exceptionally well-educated, well-read person, with a techincal expertise might know up to 5,000.

How long does it take to memorize kanji? ›

But how long does it actually take to learn Kanji? According to our calculations, if you can put in the work to learn 25 kanji a day, and you have no prior experience with Japanese, you should be able to read kanji within three months.

How do you not forget kanji? ›

  1. don't try to shove 2000 kanji down your throat all at once, take it a few at a time as you go.
  2. don't memorize kanji alone outside the context of words, they're not useful on their own, just memorize the kanji spellings of words as you learn more words. remembering words is far more important than remembering kanji.
Oct 16, 2021

How many kanji are there in N5? ›

At the N5 level, the JLPT expects you to know about 100 kanji to pass. These kanji can change slightly between tests, but you can generally expect to see the 100 most common kanji for verbs, numbers, time, places, people, basic adjectives, and directions.

How can I remember 2000 kanji? ›

Some Tips to Get the Most Out of Remember the Kanji

Don't just say the keywords out loud; literally see, hear, taste, smell and feel the stories. Make sure you know the exact meaning of each and every keyword. Look them up on Wikipedia or do a Google Image search if necessary. Study before bed and upon waking.

How many kanji are there in total? ›

The total number of kanji is well over 50,000, though few if any native speakers know anywhere near this number. In modern Japanese, the hiragana and katakana syllabaries each contain 46 basic characters, or 71 including diacritics.

Should I learn kanji or grammar first? ›

A lot of a beginner's time when using a textbook is spent looking up kanji and vocabulary. This takes your focus away from the grammar you're trying to learn and makes progression slow and frustrating. Learning (some) kanji and vocabulary first makes learning grammar a lot faster and, more importantly, easier.

How many kanji are used in daily life? ›

It is said that there are 2136 daily use kanji. ( I guess less tho..) We learn them in elementary school and junior high school.

What is the most complicated kanji? ›

The Most Difficult Japanese Kanji on Record: たいと(Taito)

たいと(taito) is the most difficult Japanese Kanji on the record with a total of 84 strokes. It is formed by combining 3 雲 (くもkumo) with 3 龍 (りゅうRyuu). 雲means cloud and 龍 means dragon in English.

Can you learn kanji in a year? ›

You would have to know all the jouyou kanji, 10,000 words, and know hundreds of grammar patterns. So, to reach near-native levels of fluency, you'd need at least a year of full-time, immersive studying.

Do Japanese speakers know all kanji? ›

Yes. They learn the standard 2136 kanji over a period of 9 years at school. Then they also read constantly so they pick up 1-2000 more on top of that. Technically zero as kanji are not a part of the spoken language.

Can Chinese read Japanese kanji? ›

No. Chinese hànzì, Japanese kanji,and Korean hanja do not use the same set of traditional Chinese characters. The characters used in Korean (hanja) and Japanese (kanji) are distinct from those used in China in many respects.

Can everyone in Japan read kanji? ›

Yes. Except for special situations such as mental or physical illness, or those having been brought up abroad, all Japanese citizens as well as most foreigners brought up in Japan can read Kanji as well as write. The school system teaches about 2100 kanji. However most adults can read about 2500 and possibly 3,000.

How many kanji do high school graduates know? ›

The Japanese Ministry of Education has a list of kanji called the jōyō kanji (常用漢字). These 2136 kanji are meant to be a literary baseline for kids who finish compulsory education. Most high school graduates know these.

How many kanji do high school students know in Japan? ›

With such a huge amount, you might assume you'd have to learn 10,000 or so just to even try to get by. But at schools in Japan, students only learn 1,006 kanji characters during their elementary school years, and another 1,000 or so are taught throughout secondary education.

Is learning kanji hard? ›

Even kanji, the boogeyman of the Japanese language, is actually pretty easy. Technology has not only made it a lot easier to learn kanji (through spaced repetition systems), but a lot easier to read and write kanji too. You no longer have to memorize the stroke order of each kanji; now, you can just type it in!

How long will it take to learn 2000 kanji? ›

Most people who want to learn the 2000 Jouyou Kanji take around 1-1.5 years if they are going at a steady pace. The timing is similar for N1 kanji lists. This of course depends on a lot of factors so let's take a look at how fast you could learn the kanji and get it out of the way!

How many kanji can you learn in a week? ›

If you believe learning KANJI is important to you, you definitely should do it. However, 10 KANJI a week along with studying vocabulary and sentence patterns sounds like an advanced-level Japanese class in college. If you have enough time to study everything at that pace, that's great.

How much Japanese can you learn in 3 months? ›

In fact, learning in 3 months may be enough for you to have basic conversations in Japanese and even read some texts. Indeed, there is no language that you cannot learn in 3 months. The only thing that is not guaranteed in 3 months is your fluency.

Can you memorize kanji without writing? ›

Writing practice is not necessary if you do not plan on handwriting Kanji. The reason why people suggest writing them is that writing something down with your hand creates a better bond in your brain. But if your condition does not allow for that, you can learn them without writing just fine.

Does writing kanji help you remember them? ›

When you type in a kanji character, it will spit out several different words that use that character. Learning this way will eventually help your brain to really understand the way that kanji is used to indicate meaning, and should really pick up your learning speed as you go.

How do you know which kanji reading to use? ›

On-reading is usually used when the kanji is a part of a compound (two or more kanji characters are placed side by site). Kun-reading is used when the kanji is used on its own, either as a complete noun or as adjective stems and verb stems.

What are the 100 most common kanji? ›

Top 100 Most Frequent Kanji Characters
#KanjiKunyomi
1hi, -bi, -ka ひ, -び, -か
2hito(tsu) ひと(つ)
3kuni くに
4a(u) あ(う)
67 more rows

What JLPT level is fluent? ›

The JLPT N1 is the highest level of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test. This official exam proves that you have a high level of Japanese that allows you to understand this language in many circumstances.

Does JLPT expire? ›

Does the JLPT certificate expire at some point? The JLPT certificate never expires.

How many kanji does duolingo teach? ›

In our Japanese course, you can learn the shapes, pronunciations, and meanings of all Hiragana characters (there are about 50), all 50 Katakana characters, and 88 basic Kanji (Chinese) characters that you need to know in order to reach basic proficiency.

Is duolingo good to learn Japanese? ›

Duolingo is an excellent free resource for learning languages, especially if you consider yourself a beginner who is looking to immerse yourself quickly in Japanese.

What is kanji called in English? ›

The word “kanji” means “Han characters” (i.e. “Chinese characters”).

How many words do you need to be fluent in Japanese? ›

About 3000-5000 words will give you 'basic fluency'. At this level you will be able to find a way to say anything you want to, but it probably won't be the way a native speaker would say it.

What is the hardest language to learn? ›

As mentioned before, Mandarin is unanimously considered the most difficult language to master in the world! Spoken by over a billion people in the world, the language can be extremely difficult for people whose native languages use the Latin writing system.

Is it better to learn kanji or vocabulary? ›

Although you can manage with only katakana and hiragana, you will still lack a lot if you don't know kanji. Therefore, you should learn kanji first before studying vocabulary. About 2,000 kanji characters are officially known to be necessary for everyday use.

Does Japan still use kanji? ›

Yes, it's true. Japanese has three completely separate sets of characters, called kanji, hiragana, and katakana, that are used in reading and writing. That first rendering of “Tokyo” is in kanji, with the hiragana version next, and the katakana one at the bottom.

How many Chinese characters do you need to know to be fluent? ›

The average Chinese person only needs to know around 2,000 characters to be recognized as fluent. Those characters represent a basic education level that can help you make it in day-to-day life.

What is the longest kanji word? ›

A funny phrase in japanese is “toragahitowokamoutosurutokinounarinow” 虎が人を噛もうとするときのうなり声。 It is 37 letters long and is comprised of a 17 syllables. It is a very odd phrase, as it is defined as “the growl a tiger makes when it is about to about to bite someone”.

What is the kanji for zero? ›

For zero in Japanese, the kanji is 零 (rei). However, it is more common to use and say “zero” the same way we say it in English: ゼロ (zero).

Is Japanese easier than Korean? ›

This makes learning Korean much easier than Japanese. Japanese has 46 letters in its alphabet. Meanwhile, Korean only has 24. If you're looking for which is easier to learn between Korean or Japanese, Korean wins this round too.

Is 10 kanji a day good? ›

If you learn 10 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 200 days (just under 7 months) If you learn 5 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 400 days (just over 13 months) If you learn just 2 kanji a day, you can learn all of them in 1000 days (less than 3 years)

How can I memorize kanji fast? ›

Best Japanese Kanji Learning Method
  1. Rote Memorization. The best way to learn any language is through repetition. ...
  2. Mnemonics. ...
  3. Learn 常用漢字 (Jouyou Kanji) ...
  4. Study the Kanji of Words that You Most Commonly Use. ...
  5. Learn Radicals. ...
  6. Learn the Kanji of Words on Your Vocabulary List. ...
  7. Read Japanese Reading Material. ...
  8. Use a Dictionary.

How many hours a day should I study Japanese? ›

Study Japanese every day

Grab a few recommended textbooks and knuckle down for at least twenty minutes a day (ideally an hour or two, but twenty minutes is better than nothing). This will give you the basics and the “correct” forms of grammar, situationally appropriate language, clear examples and practice exercises.

Should I learn kanji or vocabulary first? ›

Kanji forms an essential part of Japanese writing scripts

Although you can manage with only katakana and hiragana, you will still lack a lot if you don't know kanji. Therefore, you should learn kanji first before studying vocabulary.

How long does it take to read kanji? ›

But how long does it actually take to learn Kanji? According to our calculations, if you can put in the work to learn 25 kanji a day, and you have no prior experience with Japanese, you should be able to read kanji within three months. You probably first came across kanji when you decided to learn Japanese.

How do Japanese people learn kanji? ›

In Japanese elementary schools, students learn kanji by what may be called the 'repetition method'. Many school children have kanji practice as homework, and many students buy notebooks called 漢字練習帳 (かんじれんしゅうちょう, kanjirenshūcho) just for kanji practice!

Can you learn kanji with duolingo? ›

Does Duolingo teach you to read and write in Japanese? Yes, it does. The Duolingo Japanese course teaches you to read hiragana, katakana, and about 90 essential kanji. You should know enough kanji to pass the JLPT N5 test if you complete the Duolingo Japanese course.

Is Japanese harder than Korean? ›

This makes learning Korean much easier than Japanese. Japanese has 46 letters in its alphabet. Meanwhile, Korean only has 24. If you're looking for which is easier to learn between Korean or Japanese, Korean wins this round too.

How long does it take to become fluent in Japanese? ›

According to the US Department of State, Japanese is one of the hardest languages for English natives to learn. It doesn't have many similarities in structure to English. They estimate it takes 88 weeks of learning, or 2200 hours, to reach fluency.

How many kanjis are there? ›

The total number of kanji is well over 50,000, though few if any native speakers know anywhere near this number. In modern Japanese, the hiragana and katakana syllabaries each contain 46 basic characters, or 71 including diacritics.

Can you learn 2000 kanji in a year? ›

Most people who want to learn the 2000 Jouyou Kanji take around 1-1.5 years if they are going at a steady pace. The timing is similar for N1 kanji lists. This of course depends on a lot of factors so let's take a look at how fast you could learn the kanji and get it out of the way!

How can I remember 2000 kanji? ›

Some Tips to Get the Most Out of Remember the Kanji

Don't just say the keywords out loud; literally see, hear, taste, smell and feel the stories. Make sure you know the exact meaning of each and every keyword. Look them up on Wikipedia or do a Google Image search if necessary. Study before bed and upon waking.

How many kanji can you learn in a week? ›

If you believe learning KANJI is important to you, you definitely should do it. However, 10 KANJI a week along with studying vocabulary and sentence patterns sounds like an advanced-level Japanese class in college. If you have enough time to study everything at that pace, that's great.

How do you not forget kanji? ›

  1. don't try to shove 2000 kanji down your throat all at once, take it a few at a time as you go.
  2. don't memorize kanji alone outside the context of words, they're not useful on their own, just memorize the kanji spellings of words as you learn more words. remembering words is far more important than remembering kanji.
Oct 16, 2021

Is learning kanji hard? ›

Even kanji, the boogeyman of the Japanese language, is actually pretty easy. Technology has not only made it a lot easier to learn kanji (through spaced repetition systems), but a lot easier to read and write kanji too. You no longer have to memorize the stroke order of each kanji; now, you can just type it in!

How many kanji do Japanese students learn per year? ›

With such a huge amount, you might assume you'd have to learn 10,000 or so just to even try to get by. But at schools in Japan, students only learn 1,006 kanji characters during their elementary school years, and another 1,000 or so are taught throughout secondary education.

Can you learn Japanese while sleeping? ›

yes you can. Listening to a language while asleep can help supercharge your vocabulary. With the Learn Japanese While Sleeping Audiobook, you'll absorb over 430 Japanese words and phrases effortlessly. And of course — learn words passively — in your sleep.

What is the hardest language to learn? ›

As mentioned before, Mandarin is unanimously considered the most difficult language to master in the world! Spoken by over a billion people in the world, the language can be extremely difficult for people whose native languages use the Latin writing system.

What makes Japanese so hard to learn? ›

The Japanese language is considered one of the most difficult to learn by many English speakers. With three separate writing systems, an opposite sentence structure to English, and a complicated hierarchy of politeness, it's decidedly complex.

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